Author Archives: danielle

Valentine Math Mats

By Crafts for Learning Contributor, Danielle from the blog Crayonbox Learning.

Valentine Math Mat at ThinkCrafts.com

Materials Needed

Directions

  1. Print out the desired number of Valentine Mat Templates onto cardstock.
  2.  Using a black permanent ink marker, write math problems onto the mat.  The children will use manipulatives to find the answer to their problem.
  3. Cut out mats and laminate for durability.  (Hint: Cutting the pieces out before lamination provides a better seal around the game piece.)
  4. Add manipulatives, and the Valentine mats are now ready for play.

Variations: 

  • Instead of using manipulatives,  children can use dry erase markers to solve each problem.
  • Playing mats can also be used for Alphabet activities or other skills.

Valentine Math Mats at ThinkCrafts.com

© Danielle Westvang – Crayonbox Learning

 

Heart Puzzle

By Crafts for Learning Contributor, Danielle from the blog Crayonbox Learning.

Heart Puzzles at ThinkCrafts.com

Materials Needed

Directions

  1. Print Heart Puzzle Template onto colored cardstock.  (Purple, pink, and red were used for this tutorial but any color will work.)
  2. Using a black permanent ink marker,  write on each half of the puzzle piece.  For my example I used number, number word and dots,  alphabet letters, and opposites.  You can use these puzzles to reinforce any skill.
  3. Cut out the outside of each heart puzzle, leaving the center line uncut.
  4. Laminate the heart puzzles for durability.
  5. With sharp scissors, cut the center line of the puzzle after the lamination cools.
  6. The Heart Puzzles are ready for play!

 

© Danielle Westvang – Crayonbox Learning

Book Review: One-Skein Wonders Edited by Judith Durant, Published by Storey Publishing

By Crafts for Learning Contributor, Danielle from the blog Crayonbox Learning.

oneskeinwonders

I approached this particular book review from the perspective of a beginner. I do not have any practical experience knitting or crocheting, except for maybe the one row chains that my Mom taught me to make as a child.

The book is set up similarly to a cook book.  Each page features simplistic drawings of the project. Each project is detailed with a list of instruments, and supplies needed to complete the project.  I particularly liked the aspect that each project also included measurements of the finished piece, and how much yarn would be needed.  For people who are more visual like myself, this was a bonus!

Some of the projects utilized instructions from other projects contained in the book.  I am not sure why this was done because there would have been space to provide the instructions on the page.  It appeared more as a space filler than practical.

There is a lot of open space in this book because of the layout.  If this was any other kind of book, it would be a waste of space.  In this particular book, the space on the margins and pages separating each section can be used to write notes in.

There are nice, full color pictures in the center of the book that align with each project. In my opinion, the photos should have been placed on each project page.  The manner in which the book is formatted; the user will need to flip through the book to find some of the directions, and to find the corresponding photo so that the crafter will know how the finished product should look when complete.  This may be a challenge for some that prefer their instructions and photos to be on the same page, or being able to keep the book open to one place while working on the project.

 

The back of the book contains a directory of all of the contributors that were featured in the book including names, locations and a brief blurb as to what each shop has to offer.  A glossary of terms is also featured with knitting terms and illustrations of the various techniques. This particular feature is very helpful for a beginner to learn from.

 

Overall, the book is simplistic enough for a beginner and may also be a good find for a more seasoned knitter.  The idea that you can make a complete hat, scarf, or sweater from one skein of yarn is appealing.

 

Snowflake Match Game

By Crafts for Learning Contributor, Danielle from the blog Crayonbox Learning.
© Danielle Westvang – Crayonbox Learning

 Snowflake Matching Game at ThinkCrafts.com

 

Materials needed:

Directions:

  1. Print Snowflake template onto white cardstock.  (Stickers, embellishments, or buttons may be used as a substitute for the cardstock snowflakes).
  2. Cut out template pieces.
  3. Select a number of popsicle or other craft sticks.
  4. Using a black (permanent ink) Sharpie pen, write words onto one end of the craft stick. For my example, I used opposite words.
  5. Glue snowflake pieces onto the opposite end of the craft stick, and let dry.
  6. When the glue is completely dry on the craft sticks, the game is ready for use.

Snowman Math Mats

By Crafts for Learning Contributor, Danielle from the blog Crayonbox Learning.

© Danielle Westvang – Crayonbox Learning

snowmanmathmat1

Materials Needed:

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