DIY Home Décor – Coasters with Alcohol Inks

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Ready for some DIY home décor ideas? These gold and silver metallic coasters are made from a wooden coaster set decorated with acrylic and enamel paints and alcohol inks.

I decided to try my hand at making some decorative accessories for staging our home for sale. Here is another blog posting for DIY Home Décor: Gold and Silver Metallic Coasters. I had gold accents in the living room but silver nickel lamps – so I decided to embrace combining gold and silver.

Here are the supplies used:

I chose DecoArt Americana Decor Satin Enamel Paint 8 oz. Soft Linen because it is intended for wood. The Soft Linen was a lovely ivory color that coordinated with furnishings in the room. After painting the first coat on the coasters and their holder with a foam brush, I decided to use  sandpaper to remove any rough edges.

To keep the coasters off  my paper towel work surface, I balanced them on 2″ plastic cabone rings or medicine bottle caps (good paint cups too!).

After applying a couple of coats of paint and letting them dry, it was time to add the alcohol inks. I learned how to do this technique in Ulysses Press Books Crafting With Alcohol Inks Book. I put five drops each of the Gold Metallic and Silver Metallic alcohol inks on the applicator. The photo shows the first round of tapping the applicator on the wood, using an up and down pouncing motion – trying to not smear the dots by tilting the applicator or moving sideways without lifting the applicator.

The second and third rounds filled the space evenly but left room for the ivory to show through. I repeated the steps on the other side of the coasters.

I used a filbert paint brush to highlight the edges and base of the pieces – including the edges of the coasters.

I realized the alcohol ink color did not reach the base of the coaster holder on mine, so I added some 1/8″ washi tape in silver – with some glue for additional adhesiveness. I did not include this in the supplies because I could have added some more color near the base with a stencil brush or by removing the felt from the applicator to get closer to the base.

When the painting was finished, I sprayed all the pieces with Krylon Artist Sprays Triple Thick Glaze to seal them. It helped to let the pieces dry separately for a couple of days so the paint and glaze could cure. They still stick together a tiny bit but it is acceptable.

The last step was to add rubber bumper pads to the corners of the bottom side of the coasters. I was glad I had painted both sides because I could choose the best side to be the top – hiding any imperfections in the wood or my painting.

The coasters fit right in with my other gold and silver accessories. The origami cranes were originally each made of a white, red, or blue origami paper by a foreign exchange student from Japan. My husband sprayed them (left to right) with spray paint: Krylon Shortcuts Aerosol Paints Gold Leaf, Design Master Colortool Spray Paint #724 Ivory, and  Krylon Shortcuts Aerosol Paints Chrome. He finished by spraying them with Krylon Artist Sprays Triple Thick Glaze.

Project completed, it was time to put my alcohol inks away in their new home – the Alcohol Ink Storage Tin by Ranger. It can be completely filled with alcohol ink bottles.

I had room for my alcohol ink bottles and all my supplies!. All ready for my next alcohol inks project!

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Ann

About Ann

Ann works in Customer Service and Social Media here at CreateForLess, and has a passion for quilting. Ann has been an avid quilter for over 20 years and a quilt instructor, quilt designer and pattern writer for over 7 years. Ann's crafting interests include quilting, applique, paper piecing, machine quilting, crazy quilting, general sewing. Basically if it involves quilting...she loves it! Ann is blessed with a supportive husband and two great children (a college-age son and grown daughter) who tolerate appearing in public with her despite the inevitable thread on her clothes.

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