Farmer’s Market Tote Bag

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By Sewing Contributor Courteney from the blog Crafting with Court.

Sew a Farmer's Market Tote Bag

It is Farmers Market season around the country.  I love fresh produce.  It tastes the best!  I always had trouble deciding what bag to bring to the farmers market.  The produce is usually wet and dirty which stains my traditional green bags.  I wanted a strong bag that could hold plenty of produce but wouldn’t stain.  If you relate to this problem or simply want to make a wipe clean bag follow this tutorial!

Materials:

  1. Cut your fabric as follows:
  • Cut one 18” x 36” rectangle in the canvas and cut one 18” x 36”  rectangle in the polypropylene
  • Cut four 3” x 26” rectangles in the canvas
  • Cut one 8” x 8” rectangle in the canvas
  1. Fold each of your 18” x 36” rectangles in half with the pattern side facing creating an 18” x 18” square with the fold at the bottom.
  2. Cut a 4” x 3” rectangle out of both bottom corners of each folded square.

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  1. Pin the side of your square together, and sew them shut using a ½” seam. Repeat this on your other square of fabric.

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  1. Take the rectangle you cut out of the folded side. Pull the corners apart until the edges of your fabric align.  Pin this in place.  Run a ½” seam.  Repeat for the remaining 3 cut outs.  You have now created the body of your bag.

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  1. Take your 8” x 8” rectangle. Fold ½” of fabric over on all sides and pin it in place.   Iron these folds down.  Your finished rectangle is now 7” x 7”.
  2. Take your four 3” x 26” rectangles and tri fold the fabric. Pin the fold in place, and iron flat.  Your finished product is now 1” x 26”.
  3. Run a ¼” seam across the long side of your now 7” x 7” rectangle. This will be the top of your pocket.

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  1. Take the canvas body of your tote bag. Place the 7” x 7” rectangle in the location you want the pocket to go.  Make sure the hemmed edge you made in the previous step at the top.  Pin the pocket in place.

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  1. Run a ¼” seam around the two sides and the bottom of your pocket. Be careful not to sew through both side of the bag!
  2. Take your four 1” x 26” tri-folded rectangles. Place two of the rectangles together with pattern sides facing out.  Pin these pieces together.  Run a ¼” seam down both long sides.  Repeat using the remaining two rectangles.

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  1. Using one of the tote bag bodies, pin one of the rectangles you made in the previous step at the top of the bag 4” from the side seam. Making sure the strap doesn’t twist, pin the other side of the rectangle 4” from the other side seam.  This will place your strap 5” apart.  Repeat on the other side of the tote bag body.

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  1. Flip the other tote bag body right side in, and place it over top the other tote bag body. The pattern sides should be facing each other.  Line the seams up and pin around the top.  Leave about a 4” opening at the top.  Run a ½” seam around the top, leaving the opening open.

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  1. Pull your bag through the opening you left and push the polypropylene layer in down inside the bag.

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  1. Fold over the fabric at the opening your left and pin it closed. Run a ¼” seam around the entire top of the bag.  It will close the opening and case the top to lay flat.

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  1. Grab your bag and go to a farmers market! When you done, just take a damp cloth and wipe off the polypropylene.

Farmers Market Tote Bag

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This entry was posted in Crafts, DIY gift ideas, Needlearts, Sewing, Spring, Summer on by .
Courteney

About Courteney

Courteney will be sharing sewing, crafting, and DIY projects. Her philosophy is simple: crafting makes life better. Her projects will help you realize how easy and cost effective it is to make things for yourself. Courteney is a high school science teacher who lives in Atlanta, GA. Between raising her dog, Padfoot, and teaching she keeps pretty busy but always finds time to be creative. Her mom taught her to sew very early in life, and it has remained one of her favorite activities into adulthood. Although sewing is quickly becoming a lost art; Courteney hopes you will join her in revitalizing this skill with many fun and practical projects. Catch up with Courteney at her blog, Crafting with Court, where she shares all the projects she’s working on.

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